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Posts Tagged ‘Surveys’

Study Reveals Government Agencies Perpetually Behind in Technology Adoption

In Uncategorized on March 8, 2010 at 7:18 pm

Leading government market research firm Market Connections, Inc., today announced a new survey that calls government agencies perpetually behind the curve in technology adoption compared to the private sector, and hampered in technology adoption as a result of old legislation.

The study, which explored perceptions and adoption of new and innovative technologies among federal government decision makers, revealed the perception of technology adoption in government agencies as “slow and difficult to keep going” like a vintage Model T.

The company conducted the survey in February on behalf of the Government Information Technology Council (GITEC). GITEC is a group of senior-level government executives organized to support the delivery of high-quality and cost-effective IT services to their customers. Market Connections released the findings at the GITEC annual summit, a forum for government leaders, industry and academia to share ideas, challenges and successes surrounding the implementation, management and use of Information Technology.

Lisa Dezzutti, president of Market Connections, said, “The findings show real progress in some emerging technology and application areas. But technology engines don’t seem to be revving to keep up with needs. When asked if innovations have found their way into daily applications, more federal  decision-makers compare their agencies to vintage cars rather than today’s hybrids.”

The majority of the 223 survey respondents serve in management, operations, or IT/MIS roles, with 39% of them employed in defense/military agencies and 61% employed in federal civilian or independent agencies.

Survey highlights indicate:

• Wireless/mobile solutions and cloud computing were cited most often as technologies that, while beneficial or promising, remain the most overlooked. In fact, nearly three-quarters of respondents were either unsure if their agency has a cloud deployment plan or very clear that it doesn’t have a plan.
• Forty-five percent (45%) of respondents said their agencies are perpetually behind the technology curve compared to the private sector, while another 39% say that old legislation negatively impacts their agencies’ adoption of new technologies.
• Budget limitations narrowly outpace security concerns as the top two challenges confronting the implementation of upcoming technology initiatives. In fact, 18% reported that general hardware and software updates were the most beneficial new or innovative technologies implemented in the last 12 months.
• Nearly three in ten respondents say their agencies are not actively engaging Gen Y in the workforce; however, more than a quarter are offering competitive salaries and benefits, providing flexible work environments and increased coaching and training, respectively.

The Economic Consequences of Restrictions on Domestic Energy Exploration; Next Generation Biofuels; Devon Energy Reports 2009 Financial Results

In Uncategorized on February 15, 2010 at 9:49 pm

America’s reliance on foreign energy will grow by 19 percent over the next 20 years, expanding the transfer of U.S. wealth to the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) by more than $600 billion, according to a report by the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners.  The two-year study broadly examined the social, economic and environmental impacts of continued restrictions on developing America’s oil and gas resources.

“The study highlights the importance of developing our domestic petroleum resources in an environmentally responsible manner,” said American Trucking Associations Vice President Rich Moskowitz. “Continuing restrictions on the development of U.S. energy resources will adversely impact our economic well-being and our national security.”

The study predicts the economic results of maintaining current restrictions on accessing America’s federally owned onshore and offshore energy resources. The results, when compared with the effects that could be expected from a reasonable energy policy on federal energy resources, will include:

•Import costs for crude oil, petroleum products and natural gas will be $1.6 trillion higher;
•Imports from OPEC nations will be 4.1 billion barrels higher, resulting in increased payments to OPEC of $607 billion;
•U.S. production of crude oil will be 9.9 billion barrels lower;
•U.S. production of natural gas will be 46 trillion cubic feet lower;
•Energy-intensive industries will produce nearly 13 million fewer jobs;
•Housing starts will be 200,000 fewer;
•Annual average natural gas prices will be 17 percent higher;
•Annual average electricity prices will be 5 percent higher;
•Real disposable income will be a total of $2.34 trillion less;
•Energy costs to consumers will be $2.35 trillion higher;
•Gross Domestic Product will be $2.36 trillion lower.

The American Trucking Associations is a member of the Consumer Energy Alliance, which was among the public sector and private sector organizations that contributed energy experts’ information and analysis for the NARUC report.

The report was assembled by experts from the Science Applications International Corp. and the Gas Technology Institute and provides the most up-to-date assessment of America’s oil and natural gas resources. Utilizing the National Energy Modeling System, the study renders a quantitative summary of the jobs, revenue and number of housing starts that Americans should expect to surrender in the future under the restrictive energy policies currently in place.

To view the executive summary of the report, click here.

Next Generation Biofuels: Market Drivers, Growth Opportunities and Regulatory Change

Over 80% of the world’s primary energy supply is currently derived from coal, gas and oil (collectively known as ‘fossil fuels’), which are used to generate electricity, power, energy and heat for industrial, commercial, domestic and transportation purposes. The world’s dependence on crude oil for transportation is particularly marked, with the International Energy Agency (IEA) estimating that fuels from crude oil currently supply about 96% of the worldwide energy demand for transport purposes.

As the world’s population grows and developing countries look to expand their economies, this insatiable demand for fossil fuels is unlikely to show any sign of easing, with oil and gas accounting for 60% of the world’s increasing energy demand between now and 2030. Furthermore, with most significant reserves of fossil fuels unevenly distributed throughout the world, energy security is set to become an increasingly critical economic and political issue over the coming decades. Real or perceived disruptions to the global supply of fossil fuels — notably crude oil — are likely to grow in frequency and cause wild fluctuations in the price of energy, as they have done so in the past. However, one of the most pressing reasons for seeking alternative sources of energy and fuel lies in the form of ‘climate change’.

The combustion of fossil fuels releases carbon dioxide (CO2), a potent ‘greenhouse gas’ (GHG), which are considered by some to be responsible for ‘global warming’. According to the IEA, if no changes are made to the world’s existing energy economy, related emissions of CO2 will grow marginally faster than energy use, meaning that by 2030 global CO2 emissions will be more than 50% higher than today. Over two-thirds of that projected increase in emissions is expected to come from emerging economies, such as India, China — both of which are set to rely heavily on coal-based power stations to drive their rapidly developing economies.

The combination of biomass and biofuels accounted for around 26% of the world’s total renewable energy production in 2008. Second generation biofuels have been developed due to limitations of first generation biofuels, primarily that the resources used threatens food supplies. Second generation biofuels production processes include a variety of non-food crops such as waste biomass, the stalks of wheat, corn, wood and miscanthus. Second generation biofuels use biomass to liquid technology, such as cellulosic biofuels from non-food crops. Third generation biofuel primarily references fuel derived from algae. Algae fuel is not yet commercially available or viable due to cost constraints, but through various laboratory experiments promising results have been obtained. In 2008, the US Department of Energy noted that algae can produce 30 times more energy per acre than land crops such as soybeans.

North American Onshore Proved Reserves for Devon Energy at Record 2.6 Billion Boe; Drill-Bit Reserve Additions More than Double Record Production

Devon Energy Corporation reported that 2009 full-year and fourth-quarter financial results as well as its 2009 full-year oil and gas production from continuing operations has reached an all-time high. In addition, Devon reported record-high proved oil and natural gas reserves at December 31, 2009.

“2009 was a pivotal year for Devon as we began repositioning the company to focus entirely on our high-return, North American onshore natural gas and oil portfolio,” commented J. Larry Nichols, chairman and chief executive officer. “We grew North American onshore production by more than six percent in 2009 and replaced more than twice our production with the drill bit at very attractive costs. We expect to receive after-tax proceeds of $4.5 billion to $7.5 billion as we divest our offshore and international properties this year. This will further strengthen our rock-solid balance sheet and enable us to accelerate growth across our U.S. and Canadian asset base.”

In accordance with accounting standards, Devon’s year-end reserve reporting pertains to the company’s continuing operations, which include its Gulf of Mexico properties. Following is a discussion of proved reserves pertaining only to Devon’s North American onshore assets.

Devon increased North American onshore estimated proved reserves by 20 percent to a record 2,641 million oil-equivalent barrels (Boe) at December 31, 2009. The company added 669 million Boe to its North American onshore proved reserves from all sources. Costs incurred applicable to North American onshore properties were $3.3 billion.

Successful drilling (extensions, discoveries and performance revisions) accounted for 492 million Boe of North American onshore proved reserve additions. The company invested $3.2 billion of associated drill-bit capital during the year. Revisions related to changes in oil, natural gas and natural gas liquids prices increased 2009 North American onshore proved reserves by 176 million Boe.

North American onshore oil and gas production increased more than six percent to 220 million Boe in 2009. The reserve life index (proved reserves divided by annual production) for the North American onshore properties is approximately 12 years.

Proved developed reserves of 1,869 million Boe at December 31, 2009, represented 71 percent of total North American onshore proved reserves. Proved undeveloped reserves were 29 percent of the total. Year-end North American onshore proved reserves included 653 million barrels of crude oil, 9.4 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and 419 million barrels of natural gas liquids.

Related Links: IBISWorld industry reports

Oil Drilling & Gas Extraction in the U.S.

Global Oil and Gas Exploration and Production

Petroleum Refining in the U.S.

Rail Transportation in the U.S.

Natural Gas Distribution in the U.S.

In-Game Advertising Maximizes Marketing Dollars In Sports Category; New Mobile Advertising Opportunity for the Sports Industry

In Uncategorized on February 10, 2010 at 7:38 pm

According to a recent study conducted by TNS, advertisers interested in sports content who are not leveraging in-game advertising are missing a big opportunity. The company released findings from the ESPN Sports Poll, a monthly tracking study that explored the similarities among traditional sports fans and the sports gamer audience.

“Fans consume sports in multidimensional ways,” said Robert Fox, Senior Vice President at TNS and Executive Director of the ESPN Sports Poll. “Today’s interactive entertainment enables fans to engage with their favorite sports on a platform that looks incredibly close to the real thing.  When a person is engaged in the video game, there is no channel surfing, and the game is paused only for necessity. This is a terrific way for real-world advertisers and sponsors to develop incremental affinity for their brands.” 

Avid Fans Create an Opportunity for Marketers

The average Sports Fan follows six to eight different sports. Marketers are challenged to capture fans’ attention.  Sports Poll data has consistently shown that the average person is an “Avid” Fan of two to three sports.  By targeting the “Avid Fans”, marketing campaigns have a much better chance of being noticed by the audience that is paying the most attention, and is likely driving their business.

At 85 million, the National Football League has the largest number of Avid Fans, followed by college football (64 million) and Major League Baseball (53 million).

Sports Video Games are a Targeted Approach for Reaching the Same Avid Sports Fans Marketers Want to Reach

About half of the households in the country own a gaming console.  Of those households, half of the sports fans and 69% of the avid sports fans own at least one sports video game.  The demographic profile of the Sports Gamer is favorable to brands wanting to reach their target market through sports. 

•Three-quarters of these players are male
•More than half are between the ages of 18-34
•They tend to be single males with disposable income
•Most surprisingly, they are more physically active than sports fans in general (60% of Sports Gamers have exercised or participated in a sports activity within the past week compared with 44% of sports fans.)

Advice for Marketers

Sports video games represent an attractive opportunity for marketers to activate sponsor commitments already in place.  IEG Sponsorship estimates that about $12B, or 68 cents of every dollar, is spent on sponsorship that is sports related.  Those sponsorship investments require activation to be effective. The Sports Poll study shows that three out of four sports fans say that in-game advertising plays a part in reinforcing a company’s real-world sponsorship of that sport.

“Fans have grown to expect that the game experience mirrors the real world and allows them to be Mark Sanchez for the night.  Part of the authenticity is the advertising that is imbedded in the game or that is dynamically served during connected play, and includes the finer details like in-stadium and in-arena signage,” said Elizabeth Harz, Senior Vice President, Global Media Sales at Electronic Arts.  “For sponsors looking to differentiate their brand in a crowded field, the Sports Gamer is influential and the messaging options robust.”

(1) Question Wording:  Thinking of the sports video games you own, in a typical week during that sport’s season, do you spend more time watching live sports on television or playing sports video games (Responses were rotated).

RainedOut now allows companies to sponsor text messages sent to their members

Omnilert, LLC, maker of RainedOut, the first text message service for sports leagues and clubs, has announced a new mobile advertising medium. All RainedOut text messages will now contain a national sponsor incorporated at the end of the RainedOut notification. In a world where content is king, this opens up a unique opportunity for companies trying to reach the highly mobile sports industry. The first national sponsor is a brand from Sony called Crackle.

“This is an outstanding opportunity for all involved,” explained Ara Bagdasarian, CEO of Omnilert. “RainedOut customers will continue to enjoy our award-winning communication service free of charge, and national brands can sponsor sports organizations and receive recognition on each message.”

Players, parents, and fans opt in to RainedOut for relevant content, not spam or unsolicited ‘coupons,’ to be sent to their cell phone via SMS text messages. RainedOut delivers time-sensitive news such as game cancellations, field changes, requests for volunteers, and much more. Each text message is 160 characters long with the last 20 characters displaying a national sponsor.

“Mobile advertising up to this point has required brands to hire expensive mobile marketing firms and slowly grow their own opt-in list,” said J. Gerry Purdy, Ph.D., the Principal Analyst at MobileTrax LLC. “RainedOut offers one of the first mobile marketing opportunities that bring willing participants to the table – and at a very low cost of entry. This is a mobile service that every sports fan can appreciate, especially considering all the recent weather delays from the Daytona 500 to the Winter Olympics. I think this technique is going to be copied by a lot of other people in the industry.”

This new advertising medium allows companies to reach hundreds of thousands of eyeballs in the sports-oriented demographic. They achieve positive brand association by supporting non-profit sports organizations across America.

Each sponsor message is read on the mobile phone – a very captive environment. Sponsors receive a fast impression – 95% of text messages are read within 4 minutes. This creates what is called ‘situation-based advertising’ – a day-changing event for a customer creates a new opportunity to spend time and money.

The 20-character sponsor text can be in the form of a hyperlink, so smartphone recipients can click it to reach a website or unique landing page, which further strengthens the power of this new advertising medium. Sponsors can see the results of their mobile advertising campaigns in real time. Sponsors do not have access to individual members’ data as RainedOut enforces a zero-spam policy.

Current participating sports include:

Nationwide youth, collegiate, and adult league sports
YMCAs, Boy Scouts, and regional/county/city parks & recreation departments
•Soccer, football, baseball, softball, lacrosse, swimming, hockey, and cheerleading
•Auto racing speedways, dragways, dirt tracks, and many more

Related Links

Video Games in the U.S.IBISWorld industry report

Majority of Americans Pessimistic About Economic Recovery

In Uncategorized on December 23, 2009 at 10:35 pm

As 2009 comes to a close and Obama’s popularity dwindles, the majority of Americans are filled with significant uncertainty and anxiety about the state of the US economy – and its prospects for a quick recovery in the New Year.

Of the 1,000 Americans surveyed by telephone over the weekend by polling firm StrategyOne, nearly 9 in 10 Americans (87%) believe the US is still in a recession and 3 in 4 (78%) disagree with economic experts that the US is no longer in a recession.

Despite increasingly optimisic talk from experts about the health of economy, just 1 in 4 (26%) believe the economy will recover fully by the end of 2010. Instead, the majority of Americans – 51% – believe the economy won’t fully recover and be back on track until sometime until the end of 2011 – or even 2012. A frighteningly high 15% believe the economy will never fully recover.

“Consumers appear more likely to believe the economy has stabilized compared to the summer, but see a pretty long road to full economic recovery,” said Bradley Honan, Senior Vice President of StrategyOne, who authored the survey. “15% of US consumers believing a full recovery won’t ever take place speaks to how deeply scarred America has been left by the recession – and how the hangover is likely to last well beyond the ‘official’ end of the recession.”

The StrategyOne survey also found that slightly more people believe that the economy is on the wrong track (48%) than on the right track (44%), and most Americans believe the economy has either “not yet bottomed out and will get worse” (34%) or that “it’s at the bottom and not getting better or worse” (19%).

That’s not to say that opinions are not shifting more positively though, indeed they are. For example, Americans are not nearly as negative about the state of the economy as they were in July.

Today 42% say the economy has “bottomed out and is getting better” compared with just 30% who felt that way in July of this year. The current StrategyOne survey found that the youngest consumers polled, those 18-34 years of age, were most likely (50%) to believe the economy has already “bottomed out and is getting better” compared with just 38% of those 55 years and older, who feel the same way. There is clearly a significant generational gap about perceptions of the economy today.

“It’s clear some of the positive discussion about the economic recovery has broken through – but there is still much, much more consumers need to hear to regain their confidence in the direction of our economy,” said Bradley Honan of StrategyOne.

Survey Methodology:

StrategyOne conducted 1,000 telephone interviews among a representative sampling of Americans between December 16 and 20, 2009. The overall margin of sampling error at the 95% level of confidence is = +/- 3.1% overall and larger for subgroups. Statistical weights were designed from the United States Census Bureau statistics.